Army & Air Force Exchange Service saves a little green by employing energy-efficient equipment

DALLAS —Eyeing a potential savings of nearly $12 million in energy costs over the next four years, the Army & Air Force Exchange Service is reducing its environmental footprint by going green, the military service said.

“Energy optimization is smart business promising bottom-line results,” said AAFES [3] spokesman Judd Anstey. —Eyeing a potential savings of nearly $12 million in energy costs over the next four years, the Army & Air Force Exchange Service is reducing its environmental footprint by going green, the military service said.

AAFES, which operates more than 2,000 fast-food restaurants, including Burger King [4], Popeyes [5] Chicken, KFC [6], Pizza Hut [7] and Taco Bell [8], throughout North America, Europe, the Asia Pacific region and the Middle East, became a 2007 Energy Star partner and a member of the U.S. Green Building Council last month. —Eyeing a potential savings of nearly $12 million in energy costs over the next four years, the Army & Air Force Exchange Service is reducing its environmental footprint by going green, the military service said.

Energy Star is a program developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy to help businesses save money by decreasing rising energy costs while protecting the environment through the use of more energy-efficient products and practices. —Eyeing a potential savings of nearly $12 million in energy costs over the next four years, the Army & Air Force Exchange Service is reducing its environmental footprint by going green, the military service said.

As a result, AAFES is introducing a number of initiatives. They include the development of metrics to measure energy consumption and the renovation of current restaurant locations to meet the Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design Standard of construction and operation of green buildings. —Eyeing a potential savings of nearly $12 million in energy costs over the next four years, the Army & Air Force Exchange Service is reducing its environmental footprint by going green, the military service said.

Transitioning to Energy Star equipment is expected to reduce costs by more than 32 percent, said Roy Robertson, vice president of food and theater. “Replacing our standard efficiency equipment with high-efficiency equipment could result in estimated annual savings of nearly $6,000 per quick-serve restaurant,” he said. —Eyeing a potential savings of nearly $12 million in energy costs over the next four years, the Army & Air Force Exchange Service is reducing its environmental footprint by going green, the military service said.

Robertson said AAFES is making a large investment in the green conversion, at least $100,000 per restaurant. —Eyeing a potential savings of nearly $12 million in energy costs over the next four years, the Army & Air Force Exchange Service is reducing its environmental footprint by going green, the military service said.

As AAFES opens new restaurants, foodservice division staff members will work to incorporate available energy-efficient equipment. Also, as new pieces of Energy Star-compliant equipment become available, “we will review and incorporate them,” he said. “Capital investment in equipment can exceed $100,000 per restaurant, so research on all categories of equipment is continuing. However, not all categories have been evaluated to determine their Energy Star criteria.” —Eyeing a potential savings of nearly $12 million in energy costs over the next four years, the Army & Air Force Exchange Service is reducing its environmental footprint by going green, the military service said.

He noted that while the new restaurants are being affected immediately, some of the brands already have Energy Star-rated equipment in their existing stores. —Eyeing a potential savings of nearly $12 million in energy costs over the next four years, the Army & Air Force Exchange Service is reducing its environmental footprint by going green, the military service said.

“It is smart business,” he said. “At those units, as equipment needs to be replaced or image upgrades are completed, energy-efficient standards are applied. All 2,000-plus restaurant locations will be involved, whether they are concession, name brand, in-house brands or local subcontractors.” —Eyeing a potential savings of nearly $12 million in energy costs over the next four years, the Army & Air Force Exchange Service is reducing its environmental footprint by going green, the military service said.

He added that all of the Army & Air Force Exchange Service’s major food franchises and in-house brands are participating in the organization’s Energy Star program. —Eyeing a potential savings of nearly $12 million in energy costs over the next four years, the Army & Air Force Exchange Service is reducing its environmental footprint by going green, the military service said.

“Some current initiatives taking place include the review of such foodservice equipment as ultraviolet hood systems and walk-in refrigerators, which now meet the California Energy Commission, or CEC, standards with a new design that features electronic defrost coils and improved condensate vaporizers,” he said. —Eyeing a potential savings of nearly $12 million in energy costs over the next four years, the Army & Air Force Exchange Service is reducing its environmental footprint by going green, the military service said.

Robertson also said another of AAFES’ immediate goals is to become an energy environmental leader in the resale of military equipment. “By adopting industry best practices, such as selecting Energy Star-compatible equipment, we will move closer to meeting that objective,” he said. —Eyeing a potential savings of nearly $12 million in energy costs over the next four years, the Army & Air Force Exchange Service is reducing its environmental footprint by going green, the military service said.

To that end, Robertson continued, AAFES will replace all of the old equipment being used at the restaurants and also remodel where necessary in order to achieve the agency’s green mandate. —Eyeing a potential savings of nearly $12 million in energy costs over the next four years, the Army & Air Force Exchange Service is reducing its environmental footprint by going green, the military service said.

He added that the rising cost of utilities and oils also is “driving innovation in extending the life of cooking oils as well as prolonging the life of the new equipment.” —Eyeing a potential savings of nearly $12 million in energy costs over the next four years, the Army & Air Force Exchange Service is reducing its environmental footprint by going green, the military service said.

Robertson said AAFES also intends to focus on adding griddles, ice machines, ovens and warewashers to the list of Energy Star-compliant equipment for 2007. —Eyeing a potential savings of nearly $12 million in energy costs over the next four years, the Army & Air Force Exchange Service is reducing its environmental footprint by going green, the military service said.

In addition, Robertson said the military agency is training and educating its staff members at each brand in the usage of the new equipment. —Eyeing a potential savings of nearly $12 million in energy costs over the next four years, the Army & Air Force Exchange Service is reducing its environmental footprint by going green, the military service said.

“We have equipment maintenance training and checklists within each brand,” he said. “As new technology evolves, components such as sensor defrost cycles, carbon buildup and environmental air flow may create additional training opportunities.” —Eyeing a potential savings of nearly $12 million in energy costs over the next four years, the Army & Air Force Exchange Service is reducing its environmental footprint by going green, the military service said.

Dan Metsala, AAFES’ senior vice president of real estate, said the cost of going green is well worth the investment. —Eyeing a potential savings of nearly $12 million in energy costs over the next four years, the Army & Air Force Exchange Service is reducing its environmental footprint by going green, the military service said.

“It pays to be green,” he said. “As the cost of utilities impacts our expenses, operations and, ultimately, the dividend it provides to our programs annually, this command has to find ways to operate as efficiently as possible. By focusing on reducing our energy footprint, we hope to make military installations and the world as a whole, a better place to live, work and shop.” —Eyeing a potential savings of nearly $12 million in energy costs over the next four years, the Army & Air Force Exchange Service is reducing its environmental footprint by going green, the military service said.